TORONTO -- Fired Sportsnet baseball analyst Gregg Zaun was "blindsided and emotionally gutted" by recent allegations of inappropriate comments toward female colleagues, saying in a statement Monday that he "naively" believed his language was not offensive. In an "absolute apology" issued through his Toronto-based lawyer Stuart Ducoffe, the former Blue Jays catcher said he was sorry "for any harm or distress which may have been caused by my comments with any female colleagues over the recent past. "It has never been my intention to give offence to anyone," he said. Zaun was fired as an MLB studio analyst on Thursday after multiple female Sportsnet employees complained about his inappropriate behaviour in the workplace. "After investigating the matter, we decided to terminate his contract, effective immediately," said Rick Brace, president of Rogers Media, in a statement. "This type of behaviour completely contradicts our standards and our core values." Monday's statement was Zaun's first public response to the allegations. "I have done a lot of soul searching over the last few days and know that my ignorance of the harm caused by my language does not excuse it -- for which I accept responsibility," he said. "While I am well recognized for my unfiltered criticism of others within the sports world, which has made many critics and enemies -- in ignorance I allowed a similar attitude to influence all aspects of my lifestyle, causing distress for female colleagues." Zaun's dismissal comes at a time when allegations of sexual harassment are widespread in the film industry, politics and the newsroom with prominent figures such as producer Harvey Weinstein, broadcaster Charlie Rose and "Today" show host Matt Lauer among those accused. According, there were no allegations of physical or sexual assault against Zaun. Two Sportsnet employees who spoke with The Canadian Press on Friday painted a picture of an offensive workplace environment where sexist comments are tolerated and women are afraid to speak up. "Zaun's on-air brand and image was based around aggressive masculinity so when he wore (undershirts) around the office and made rude sexual comments