Got company coming for the holidays? Check out this Beverly Hills estate once owned by “Soul Train’s” Don Cornelius. Offered at $20,000 a month, it can also be rented for as short a period as three days. Could be a great place to stash the in-laws. The hilltop estate encompasses half an acre and includes a main house, a guest house and a swimming pool. Floor-to-ceiling windows take in city views. There are high ceilings with exposed beams, three fireplaces, two kitchens, five bedrooms and five bathrooms within the 4,000 square feet of living space. A sound system for music throughout the house and grounds, three high-definition flat-screen televisions and a movie theater with a 15-foot projection screen are among the amenities. The onetime home of "Soul Train's" Don Cornelius is available for rent in Beverly Hills.  (Realtor.com) The black-bottom swimming pool, a landscaped patio, a terrace and a barbecue area extend the entertaining space outdoors. In addition to the two-car garage, there’s covered parking for six vehicles and a gated courtyard that can be used for overflow parking. Day rates run from $500 to $1,500 depending on the use. The estate is available for filming, photoshoots and events as well. Cornelius, who died in 2012 at 75, created “Soul Train” in 1970 serving as a writer, producer and host. The long-running African American syndicated music series featured such now-legendary artists as James Brown, Marvin Gaye and the Jackson 5. The property last sold in 2013 for $1.39 million and is listed by the current owner on Zillow. CAPTION Kid Rock recently sold his Balinese-inspired compound for $9.5 million, $2.1 million less than he paid for it in 2006, in a deal completed off-market. Kid Rock recently sold his Balinese-inspired compound for $9.5 million, $2.1 million less than he paid for it in 2006, in a deal completed off-market. CAPTION Kid Rock recently sold his Balinese-inspired compound for $9.5 million, $2.1 million less than he paid for it in 2006, in a deal completed off-market. Kid Rock recently sold his Balinese-inspired compound for $9.5 million, $2.1 million less than he paid for it in 2006, in a deal completed off-market. CAPTION