It wasn’t the handsome, English Revival architecture of 242 Woodland Road that attracted its current owners to the home. Nor was it the landscaped lot surrounded with pines, shrubs and bushes. It also wasn’t the wine cellar in the basement or the posh Chestnut Hill ZIP code. Instead, it was the crisp and clean, frosty white contemporary interior of the 4-bedroom house now on the market for $3.2 million. “I’m from Denmark,” the owner said earlier this week, “and it has a very Scandinavian look.” When the owner’s family moved into the home nearly four years ago, she said they had toured several other homes, but were put off by the dark, heavy interiors typical of old New England. Renovated in 2012, the Woodland Road house was previously turned into an open and modern dwelling that takes up three levels — from the finished basement to the second floor — and more than 6,500 square feet. Despite the size of the place, it feels cozy. From the inside, the first floor looks like a new take on a midcentury ranch, with big, spacious rooms and modestly high ceilings: It all comes off as overwhelmingly horizontal. The eat-in kitchen is expansive, but manageable, with massive slabs of white marble on the countertops and island that anchor and divide the room. Nearby is the formal dining room — built into an addition on the rear — that’s so bright it feels like a sunporch. Leading upstairs from the common rooms on the first level is a curved staircase that almost seems to swoop down from the second floor. Upstairs are the bedrooms that all feel like they could be master suites (the home has more bathrooms than bedrooms) except that the actual master suite has a walk-in closet that has its own shoe closet and its own separate storage closet. Built by August Johnson Associates and Joseph Daniels Leland Company in the 1930s, the original brick home is described by state records as an English Revival and by the real estate agent as a Colonial. With its modest, yet distinctive look, it’s hard to lump the place in the vastly inclusive Colonial Revival category: There’s the steep, hipped roof covered in slate tiles, imposing brick chimney on the side, segmental arched door with