Led Zeppelin's three surviving members briefly share courtroom at 'Stairway to Heaven' trial

Led Zeppelin’s three surviving members reunited Friday in Los Angeles, not to rev up the iconic rock band one more time but to defend themselves against charges that the group’s 1971 classic “Stairway to Heaven” was stolen in part from another band’s song.

The group’s bassist, John Paul Jones, was called to testify by a lawyer representing his band mates, guitarist Jimmy Page and singer Robert Plant, who looked on from their seats a few feet away from where Jones took the witness stand.

Jones testified that he’d never seen L.A. rock band Spirit in concert, that he owned none of the group’s albums or singles and was not familiar with the group’s 1968 song “Taurus,” which is the focus of the copyright infringement trial. After less than 15 minutes on the stand, Jones was excused and exited the courtroom.

Jurors also heard testimony about the millions of dollars that “Stairway” allegedly has earned, and from a musicologist who argued on behalf of Zeppelin that the few similarities that exist between the two songs are commonplace and insignificant. 

For his final witness before resting the plaintiff’s case, Francis Malofiy, the attorney representing the estate of Spirit guitarist and songwriter Randy Wolfe, called an economist to testify about the money that "Stairway" is said to have generated. 

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