After six years of drought, this is the winter weather we're 'supposed to be getting,' meteorologists say

The slow but steady improvement in California’s drought picture should accelerate in the new year with a series of storms that are expected to dump rain and snow in Northern California.

The northern half of the state has already seen impressive rains this fall and winter, filling reservoirs and replenishing the Sierra snowpack, a key source of water for California cities and farmlands.

A storm system is expected to bring rain and snow throughout the week in Northern California, and a foot of snow is expected Tuesday in the Sierra Nevada and another foot or two is predicted for Wednesday, said Johnnie Powell, a weather forecaster with the National Weather Service.  

“This is what we’re supposed to be getting,” Powell said. “After six years of a drought, I love saying that. This is normal rain and snow that we’re supposed to be getting in December and January.”

That same system might bring much-needed moisture to Southern California by the middle of the week. But that’s just a precursor to a bigger storm, NWS meteorologist Joe Sirard said.

The main event, a stronger storm system, is expected to move into the Los Angeles County area late Saturday and continue until Monday.

“There is the potential that if the main moisture feed into Southern California lines up over Ventura and L.A. counties, we could be under the gun for many inches of rain,” Sirard said. 

Steady rain since the fall has pulled 15% of the state — all of it up north — out of drought conditions, according to the National Weather Service and the U.S. Drought Report. 

But while Northern California has begun to rebound from the drought, Southern California remains dry.

Los Angeles marked a sober milestone last year, when the NWS announced that the last five years were the driest ever documented in downtown L.A. since official record-keeping began almost 140 years ago. Precipitation during that period totaled just 38.79 inches — roughly half of the normal amount.

But December turned out to be a boon for Southern California, with a series of storms dumping decent amounts of rain and snow. It ended up being the wettest December since 2010.

State officials have said it’s far too early to declare the six-year drought over, though they acknowledge the improvements in Northern California.

In late December, officials said the Sierra Nevada snowpack was at 72% of normal. They expect that number to increase in the coming weeks.

Northern California’s improving fortunes help Southern California’s drought picture — but only to a point. Though Southern California still gets some water from the Sierra, about 50% of its supply comes from local sources such as groundwater and reservoirs. 

December’s conditions and cold temperatures across the state have provided a winter wonderland view in both Southern California and the Bay Area, with mountain peaks getting strong dustings of snow.

The Grapevine was closed for periods in recent weeks because of heavy snowfall, and some motorists were temporarily stranded on mountain roads.

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