That fidget spinner your kid can’t put down? It turns out it may be putting children at risk for lead exposure. That’s according to a report out Thursday from a consumer advocacy group, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education Fund. The organization tested the toys — which represent the latest iteration of a long line of skill-based amusements that include yo-yos and spinning tops — for lead. At least two of about 12 models — products called Fidget Wild Premium Spinner Brass and Fidget Wild Premium Spinner Metal — were found to contain levels of lead that are unsafe for children, said Dev Gowda, a PIRG public health advocate who co-authored the report. U.S. PIRG found the devices to have lead on their surface level and the layer immediately beneath. Preventing lead exposure, especially for young children, is considered a public health imperative. It can impair brain development, especially in younger children, and have lifelong consequences. Flint, Mich., for instance, made national headlines when lead was discovered in its public water system. The problem is also often associated with paint in old buildings. Could a kid’s toy really be the next culprit? Bulls i Toy, which makes the two models, said in a letter to U.S. PIRG that the spinners are marketed toward people 14 and up, and therefore exempt from federal regulations about lead in toys. Target, which sells them, has no plans to stop. It also argued that the “14 and up” distinction makes these general-use toys, not meant for kids. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which comes up with safety standards for consumer products, also treats fidget spinners as “general use,” unless the company has specified they are for kids 12 and under. Children’s toys, unlike general use ones, are held to tougher lead-level standards. Consumer advocates are disputing that “general use” classification. In the meantime, though, consumers need answers. How big a problem is this? Should parents be worried about kids who have fidget spinners? Should the toys be scratched off Christmas lists? Kaiser Health News spoke with two lead experts: Jerome Paulson, an emeritus professor and pediatrician at