Edwin Moses turned the corner, saw the blue police lights in the distance and, immediately, started spinning. His senses overwhelmed by the strength of the strobing lights, Moses fell to the ground and crawled to the sidewalk, then used every ounce of energy to stand up and stagger back to his car. Somehow, he made it home safely that night. Within a week, he was lying in a hospital bed, losing feeling in his legs, wondering if he would ever walk again. The incident on the streets of Atlanta came shortly after Moses suffered his second traumatic brain injury in the span of two months — one from a tumble down the stairs, the second when he banged his head hard on the doorjamb of his car. Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW After the second accident, Moses suffered bleeding beneath his skull, and stayed in the hospital for about a week. Moses rejected "traditional" physical therapy for concussions that would have involved relearning how to walk and instead chose a more aggressive approach offered by his friend, physical therapist and former track star Rene Felton Bessozi. Three months after that scary night on the street, Moses is nearing 100 percent — a credit to the talent and tenacity of one of the world's best athletes, combined with a therapy he says put him on the fast track to recovery. "The first thing I said was, 'Nobody's going to believe this story,'" Moses said. "It was the worst possible scenario and I was able to walk again. It really didn't look like it would go that way when they were lifting my legs into the bed and I couldn't control my upper body." The 62-year-old Moses began making the impossible seem possible starting in the 1970s, when he set a world record and won the gold medal in the 400-meter hurdles at the Montreal Olympics. He took another Olympic gold in 1984, and to this day, holds four of the 10 top times in the event, including a mark of 47.02 that remains the second-best of all time. His streak of 122 straight races without a loss still stands as one of the most remarkable feats in sports. He fought for athletes' rights during his career, helping develop an