Photo: Malapropisms such as "I want to be effluent" made for regular gags on TV comedy Kath and Kim. (AAP) American film director Judd Apatow once confessed to Stephen Colbert that he'd been mispronouncing his wife Leslie Mann's name for nearly two decades. He'd been saying "Lez-lee", while she pronounces it as "Less-lee". When he asked her why she hadn't corrected his mistake, she said she "thought he wouldn't be able to make the adjustment". Barbra Streisand, unlike Mann, is reportedly insistent that her name be pronounced correctly by everyone, even Apple's voice assistant Siri. In Australia, mispronunciation is often said as "mispronounciation". Although it is a noun, there's no "noun" in it. In 1987, Harold Scruby, who later functioned as deputy mayor of the Mosman City Council, published a quirky compendium of instances of mispronunciation by Australians. He labelled these "Waynespeak". Prior to the publication of Mr Scruby's book, his friend Leo Schofield had run some of the expressions in his Sydney Morning Herald column and been drowned in "a Niagara of correspondence". Hordes of respondents regarded these expressions to be at least non-standard, or just plain wrong. Despite this, many of Mr Scruby's examples remain current today: "anythink" and its companions "everythink", "nothink", and "somethink"; "arks" ("ask"); "astericks" ("asterisk"); "bought" ("brought"); "could of" ("could've"); "deteriate" ("deteriorate"); "ecksetra" ("et cetera"); "expresso" ("espresso"); "haitch" ("aitch"); "hone in" ("home in"); and so on through to the end of the alphabet with "youse". For those of us who wince when we hear "youse", it might be a surprise to find the term in a dictionary. The Macquarie Dictionary feels compelled to explain the dictionary is a complete record of Australian English. The criterion for inclusion in it is thus "evidence of currency in the language community". When I polled friends for their pet pronunciation peeves, many of them listed those in the Waynespeak collection, while others added examples that readers may cringe at: "cachay" ("cache") and "orientate" ("orient"). A favourite was "Moët" — often pronounced as "Mo-eee" or "Mo-way".